60,800 Professionals Agree: The President of the U.S. is a Crazy Ass Criminal

26000 mental health professionals signed on to a letter warning the public about Trump's mental health.

Professionals Agree U.S. President Is A Crazy Ass Criminal

By D. S. Mitchell

60,000 Mental Health Professionals Agree

60,000 mental health professionals have signed on to a letter warning of Donald J. Trump’s mental instability. Now 800 former prosecutors claim if Trump were not president he would have been indicted for obstruction of justice. So, that is 60,800 people who point to the president of the U.S. as a crazy ass criminal. Hmm.

800 Former Prosecutors Sign On

Recently 800 former prosecutors signed on to a letter stating that if Donald J. Trump was not President of the United States he would be indicted for obstruction of justice. Sadly, Donald J. Trump is president of the United States. This is not the first time that Donald Trump has been identified as unfit to be president of the United States.

Please Read

Robert Mueller was Special Counsel

Robert Mueller was appointed Special Counsel to investigate the Russian interference in 2016 Presidential election

The former prosecutors who signed on to the public letter are begging the American people to please read the Mueller Report. The Report can be downloaded from the internet or purchased at Amazon or Wal-Mart. By reading the report anyone will be able to see Trump’s efforts at obstruction of justice close up.

Listen To The Experts

It might serve us well to listen to the experts when it comes to criminal obstruction of justice. I am reading the Mueller Report as I write this post, and it is disturbing. No matter what AG Bill Barr and President Trump claim, the experts are screaming at us. Donald Trump is not only mentally ill, he is also a criminal.

DOJ Policy

The Mueller report did not determine that Trump had committed criminal obstruction of justice, in part because of the DOJ policy against indicting sitting presidents, but Mueller did write that “if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.”

Over, Is Not Over

There are so many troublesome questions about what the president did, and is doing, that it is impossible for any thinking American to believe that we should just turn off the lights, close the door and ignore the findings of a $25 million dollar, two-and-one-half-year investigation. Maybe the bought-off Republicans are ready to sign on to AG Barr’s fictional exoneration story but most of us are not.

Corrupt Attempt

In their public letter, now 800 prosecutors state, “The Mueller report describes several acts that satisfy all the elements for an obstruction charge: conduct that obstructed or attempted to obstruct the truth-finding process, as to which the evidence of corrupt intent and connection to pending proceedings is overwhelming.” The eleven following areas of possible obstruction are taken as direct quotes from the prosecutor’s letter.

800 former prosecutors claim Trump committed obstruction of justice

800 former prosecutors claim Trump committed obstruction of justice multiple times

The Eleven Areas of Possible Obstruction  

  1. Trump campaign denies Russian connections. “After WikiLeaks released politically damaging Democratic Party emails that were reported to have been hacked by Russia, Trump publicly expressed skepticism that Russia was responsible for the hacks….Trump also denied having any business in or connections to Russia, even though as late as June 2016 the Trump Organization had been pursuing a licensing deal for a skyscraper to be built in Russia called Trump Tower Moscow. After the election, the president expressed concerns to advisors that reports of Russia’s election interference might lead the public to question the legitimacy of his election.”
  2. Trump asks Comey for “loyalty,” and then to “go easy”  on Michael Flynn.  “On January 27, 2017 the day after the President was told that Flynn had lied to the Vice President and had made similar statements to the FBI, the President invited FBI Director Comey to a private dinner at the White House and told Comey that he needed loyalty. On February 14, the day after the President requested Flynn’s resignation, the President told an outside advisor, ‘Now that we fired Flynn, the Russia thing is over’… Later that afternoon, the President cleared the Oval Office to have a one-on-one meeting with Comey. Referring to the FBI’s investigation of Flynn, the President said, ‘I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.'”
  3. Trump rages against Session’s recusal, and puts even more pressure on Comey. “In early March, the President told White House Counsel Donald McGahn to stop Sessions from recusing. And after Sessions announced his recusal on March 2, the President expressed anger at the decision and told advisors that he should have an Attorney General who would protect him. That weekend, the President took Sessions aside at an event and urged him to ‘unrecuse’…(T)he President reached out to the Director of National Intelligence and the leaders of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the National Security Agency (NSA) to ask them what they could do to publicly dispel the suggestion that the President had any connection to the Russian election-interference effort…The President also twice called Comey directly, not withstanding guidance from McGahn to avoid direct contacts with the Department of Justice.”

    James Comey Reports Distressing Conversations

    James Comey Reports Distressing Conversations with President Donald Trump

  4. Trump fires Comey. “The day of the firing, the White House maintained that Comey’s termination resulted from independent recommendations from the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General that Comey should be discharged for mishandling the Hillary Clinton email investigation. But the President had decided to fire Comey before hearing from the Department of Justice. The day after the firing Comey, the President told Russian officials that he had ‘faced great pressure because of Russia,’ which had been ‘taken off’ by Comey’s firing. The next day, the President acknowledged in a television interview that he was going to fire Comey regardless of the Department of Justice’s recommendation and that when he ‘decided to just do it,’ he was thinking that ‘this thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story.'”
  5. Trump freaks out over Mueller’s appointment and tries to quash it. “The President reacted to news that a Special Counsel had been appointed by telling advisors that it was ‘the end of his presidency’ and demanding that Sessions resign. Sessions submitted his resignation, but the President ultimately did not accept it. The President told aides that the Special Counsel had conflicts of interest and suggested that the Special Counsel therefore could not serve. On June 14, 2017, the media reported that the Special Counsel’s Office was investigating whether the President had obstructed justice…The President reacted to this news with a series of tweets criticizing the Department of Justice and the Special Counsel’s investigation. On June 17, 2017  the President called McGahn at home and directed him to call the Acting Attorney General (Rosenstein) and say that the Special Counsel had conflicts of interest and must be removed. McGahn did not carry out the direction, however, deciding that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre (a reference to Nixon firing numerous DOJ officials on October 20, 1973 related to the Watergate scandal).
  6. Trump tries to stop Mueller’s investigation. “On June 19, 2017, the President met one-on-one in the Oval Office with his former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, a trusted advisor outside the government, and dictated a message for Lewandowski to deliver to Sessions. The message said that Sessions should publicly announce that, not withstanding his recusal from the Russia investigation, the investigation was ‘very unfair’ to the President, the President had done nothing wrong, and Sessions planned to meet with the Special Counsel and ‘let (him) move forward with investigating election meddling for future elections.’ One month later, in another private meeting with Lewandowski on July 19, 2017, the President asked about the status of his message for Sessions to limit the Special Counsel investigation to future election interference. Lewandowski did not want to deliver the President’s message personally, so he asked senior White House official Rick Dearborn to deliver it to Sessions. Dearborn was uncomfortable with the task and did not follow through.”

    Donald Trump Jr. gave conflicting stories about Trump Tower meeting with Russian lawyer

    Trump Jr. gave conflicting stories about the Trump Tower meeting with Russian attorney

  7. Trump suppresses information on Trump Tower meeting with a Russian agent. “On several occasions, the President directed aides not to publicly disclose the emails setting up the June 9 meeting, suggesting that the emails would not leak and that the number of lawyers with access to them should be limited. Before the emails became public, the President edited a press statement for Trump Jr. by deleting a line that acknowledged that the meeting was with ‘an individual who (Trump Jr.) was told might have information helpful to the campaign’ and instead said only that the meeting was about adoptions of Russian children. When the press asked questions about the President’s involvement in Trump Jr.’s statement, the President’s personal lawyer repeatedly denied the President had played any role.”
  8. Trump again pressures Sessions to un-recuse and get control of Mueller. “In early summer 2017, the President called Sessions at home and again asked him to reverse his recusal from the Russia investigation. Sessions did not reverse his recusal. In October 2017, the President met privately with Sessions in the Oval Office and asked him to ‘take (a) look’ at investigating Clinton. In December 2017, shortly after Flynn pleaded guilty pursuant to a cooperation agreement (with Special Counsel), the President met with Sessions in the Oval Office and suggested, according to notes taken by a senior advisor, that if Sessions unrecused and took back supervision of the Russia investigation, he would be a ‘hero.'”
  9. Trump orders Don McGahn to lie about earlier efforts to fire Mueller. “In early 2018, the press reported that the President had directed McGahn to have the Special Counsel removed in June 2017 and that McGahn had threatened to resign rather than carry out the order. The President reacted to the news stories by directing White House officials to tell McGahn to dispute the story and create a record stating he had not been ordered to have the Special Counsel removed.”
  10.  Trump tries to flatter and perhaps bribe Flynn and Manafort.  “After Flynn withdrew from a joint defense agreement with the President and began cooperating with the government, the President’s personal counsel left a message for Flynn’s attorneys reminding them of the President’s warm feelings toward Flynn, which he said ‘still remains,’ and asking for a ‘heads up’ if Flynn knew ‘information that implicates the President’…During Manafort’s prosecution and when the jury in his criminal trial was deliberating, the President praised Manafort in public, said that Manafort was being treated unfairly, and declined to rule out a pardon. After Manafort was convicted, the President called Manafort ‘a brave man’ for refusing to ‘break’ and said that ‘flipping almost ought to be outlawed.'” **Reporting on May 16, 2019 indicates that General Michael Flynn and his attorneys were contacted multiple times by Trump surrogates in the Congress (person or persons as yet unidentified).

    President Trump blamed the Democrats and "liar" Michael Cohen for his problems

    President Trump blamed the Democrats and “liar” & “rat” Michael Cohen for his problems

  11. Trump tries to intimidate Michael Cohen.  “The President’s conduct toward Michael Cohen, a former Trump Organization executive, changed from praise for Cohen when he falsely minimized the President’s involvement in the Trump Tower Moscow project, to castigation of Cohen when he became a cooperating witness…(A)fter Cohen began cooperating with the government in the summer of 2018, the President publicly criticized him, called him a ‘rat,’ and suggested that his family members had committed crimes.'”

Summary Of Principal Findings

William Barr provided his summary of principal findings

William Barr provided a 4 page summary of principal findings.

On March 24, 2019 Attorney General William Barr issued a four page letter giving a “summary of principal findings” of the Mueller Report. Three weeks later, on April 18, 2019 Barr stood before television cameras and said that Robert Mueller had found no actionable incidents where the President had committed a criminal obstruction of justice. Nor, was there ‘collusion’ with the Russians.

Mueller Report Contradictions

Despite Barr’s claims the Mueller’s Report was a clear depiction of exactly what President Trump did to stop the investigation. In other words, to commit a criminal obstruction of justice. Barr with the flat affect of a zombie told the world it would be hard to prove such allegations beyond a reasonable doubt.

Disputed Findings

Barr determined that the Mueller report was “not sufficient” to establish any criminal wrongdoing by the president including criminal obstruction of justice. However, 0ver 800 former federal prosecutors acknowledged the potential defenses of Trump’s behavior and rejected Barr’s reasoning anyway.

Report Hamstrung

Many feel that The Mueller Report was hamstrung by DOJ regulations. However,”To look at these facts and say that a prosecutor could not probably sustain a conviction for obstruction of justice — the standard set out in Principles of Federal Prosecution — runs counter to logic and our experience,” wrote the 800 plus former prosecutors who signed a letter of protest to the Attorney General Barr’s reported conclusions on criminal obstruction of justice.

In Favor Of Prosecution

“As former federal prosecutors, we recognize that prosecuting obstruction of justice cases is critical because unchecked obstruction — which allows intentional interference with criminal investigations to go unpunished — puts our whole system of justice at risk,” they concluded. “We believe strongly that, but for the (Office of Legal Counsel policy against indicting a sitting President), the overwhelming weight of professional judgment would come down in favor of prosecution for the conduct outlined in the Mueller Report.”

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Rudy Giuliani: Moments Great And Small

Rudy Giuliani was elected as the mayor of new york city

Rudy Giuliani: Moments Great And Small

By D.S. Mitchell and Michael Leonard Douglas

Chances Offered

Rudy Giuliani has great moments and small

Most men are offered only one chance at greatness. Fewer men yet rise to extraordinary levels of heroism to be followed by extraordinary levels of greed, depravity, and personal and political immorality. But, Rudy Giuliani isn’t your average guy.

Background

Rudolph William Louis Giuliani was born in East Flatbush, Brooklyn, borough of New York City, N.Y. May 28, 1944. Rudy was the only child of working class parents Harold Angelo Giuliani and Helen D’Avanzo Giuliani. Both parents were children of Italian immigrants. Rudy Giuliani’s large extended family was mostly made up of criminals, cops and firefighters. “I grew up with uniforms all around me,” he has reportedly said.

Secrets Exposed

Rudy's father spent 18 months in Sing Sing for felony robbery and assault

Rudy’s father spent 18 months in Sing Sing for robbery and assault before Rudy’s birth

In 1934, ten years before Rudy Giuliani’s birth, his father was arrested for robbing a milkman at gunpoint.  He was later convicted of felony assault and robbery. He served 18 months at Sing Sing, a maximum security prison in New York state. When he was released from prison he had trouble finding employment and ended up “working as an enforcer for his brother-in-law Leo D’Avanzo. D’Avanzo ran an organized crime operation involved in loan sharking and gambling” (Wikipedia).

A Move 

To Harold Giuliani’s credit he moved his small family from East Flatbush to Long Island to distance his son from the mob connected members of the family. In fact, Rudy Giuliani remembers his father constantly reinforcing a deep respect for law and order. “He made sure that I didn’t repeat his mistakes-which I thank him for, because it worked out” (Biography.com)

Education 

Rudy Giuliani received his early education at St. Anne’s a local Catholic elementary school. He attended Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School. He was an average to mediocre student, graduating in 1961. Despite being a less than enthusiastic student Giuliani was an organizer and class politician. By the time of graduation he had begun to think about entering the priesthood. Giuliani went on to study at Manhattan College in the Bronx. He studied political science and philosophy.

The Law

Rudy Giuliani chose law over the priesthood

Rudy Giuliani chose law over the priesthood

After a less than stellar high school and undergraduate college career Rudy Giuliani discarded his intent to enter the priesthood and decided to pursue a law degree. Rudy took to the law like the proverbial duck to water. He graduated from New York University School of Law cum laude with a Juris Doctorate in 1968.  After excelling at his law studies he earned him a prestigious law clerk position with Judge Lloyd Francis MacMahon.  MacMahon was a U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York.

Beginning Career

When his clerkship with Judge MacMahon ended the judge recommended Rudy Giuliani for a position in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Washington, D.C.  In 1973, at age 29, Giuliani was appointed the attorney in charge of police corruption cases resulting from the Knapp Commission. He worked under Harold “Ace” Tyler.  In 1977 he left the U.S. Attorney’s Office to work in private practice. He was hired  as an associate at Tyler’s prestigious New York law firm, Patterson, Belnap, Webb & Tyler.

Exaggerated  Self-Image

Just three years later he returned to public service. He was tapped by President Ronald Reagan to become the number 3 at the  Department of Justice. In 1983 Giuliani was appointed U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York. The SDNY is one of the most visible and prestigious U.S. attorney’s office in the country.  It was a  natural fit. Rudy’s style of news conferences and camera-ready prosecutions made him a natural. Harold “Ace” Tyler who worked with Rudy Giuliani in private practice and at the DOJ described Giuliani’s tactics as “overkill” (Time Magazine).

Record Setting

At the SDNY Rudy Giuliani’s efforts were mostly directed at the prosecution of white-collar lawbreakers, organized crime, and corruption within various government institutions. His conviction record was astounding. He became one of the most revered U.S. attorneys in American history. Rudy Giuliani was responsible for a total 4,152 successful convictions. He had a mere 25 reversals. However, his many critics saw him as a boisterous  grand-stander. In several high-profile cases he had people arrested and paraded before cameras for the 6 o’clock news shows. He would later quietly drop the charges.

Taking On The Mafia

Rudy Giuliani was instrumental in mafia convictions

Rudy Giuliani was instrumental in mafia convictions dramatically weakening the “5 Families”

Between 2/25/1985 and 11/19/1986 Rudy Giuliani became the most famous prosecutor  in America. Giuliani played center stage on the high-profile Mafia Commission trials.  Using the RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act) he indicted 11 organized crime figures including heads of the “Five Families”. He summed up the indictments this way, “Our approach is to wipe out the five families”.

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Books About Donald J. Trump and Other Literary Legacies

BOOKS ABOUT DONALD J. TRUMP AND OTHER LITERARY LEGACIES

“A biography, is a detailed description of a person’s life. It involves more than just the basic facts like education, work, relationships, and death; it portrays a person’s experience of these life events,” Wikipedia

By T.K. McNeil

Write It All Down

Trump rarely reads and has been writing his memoir on his Twitter feed.

Trump rarely reads and is writing his memoir on his Twitter feed, 240 characters at a time

We live in an age of documentation. The word “biography” did not enter the English lexicon until relatively recently. We now have the ability to create personalized literature 240 characters at a time.  I’m sure a book about Donald Trump will someday be written based on his Twitter feed.  Before this age of technology however, a person had to be somewhat well-known  before anyone would think to write, or read, a book about them. One group that has almost always been in this category are U.S. presidents.

Once In The Ground

For much of American history, a president could count on being at least out of office before the ink began to fly. Some of the former leaders with the most pages dedicated to them being those who are long dead. Once in the ground, presidents become easy targets for writers and historians to delve into every aspect of their life and career from multiple angles. It’s always easier once someone is dead to dig about in their personal correspondence and investigate rumor and innuendo, and talk to people who shared time with the president.

Give It A Little Time

Before the 21st century most presidents were not written about until after death

Before the 21st century most presidents were not written about until after death

The explanation of course is due to the importance of each presidency to the history of the Republic and the politics of the time. Furthermore, once a president passes he is no longer available to explain himself and the effects of his actions are much more clear through the lens of time.

Paradigm Shift

In the early 1990’s, there was a bit of a shift in presidential biographies. The main outlets for written presidential accounts shifted from after-the-fact books and biographies to the minute-by-minute style of newspaper articles written as books at the time of their presidency. There have been many such books written about Donald J. Trump. Some writers are just trying to figure out what is going on, while others are tell-all’s by former insiders. One of the books written about Donald Trump, specifically his rise to power in 2016, actually being called, “How the Hell Did This Happen?” A bit more surprising is the fact that it was written by self-described “Republican” P. J. O’Rourke.

Actually Number One

There are so many books being written I have had to get an assistant reader

There are so many books being written about Trump I have had to get an assistant reader

For all Trump’s bluster about his achievements and profound faculties, many of them delusional, there is one area in which the current president holds the crown. There are more books about Donald Trump in the third year of his first term than any other living, let alone sitting president, in history.

Outlandish!

Sounds crazy. Donald J. Trump can barely be bothered to read; and writes mostly in 240 word tweets, often with childish spelling errors. Amazingly there have been more books written about Donald Trump than any other living president. Which is now down to Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. None of whom are, or should be, immune from criticism.

Sheer Volumes

First let’s set some limits and define some terms. The focus is on books about Donald J.Trump specifically. More than only his presidency, but his life, his business career or even his campaign were scrutinized and written about extensively and published between when he got into office and now. There have been at least 51 books published about the Trump presidency since May 2016. At least 60% of these books about Trump books come out in 2018. Astonishingly, that’s 2.5 books about Trump per month for a total of 30 new publications in 2018.

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Consensus Future, Cultural Nostalgia & The Rise of the New Populism

The future is coming while we are looking backwards

“We look at the present day through a rear-view mirror. We march backwards into the future”. Marshall McLuhan

COMMENT AND OPINION:

CONSENSUS FUTURE, CULTURAL NOSTALGIA, & THE RISE OF THE NEW POPULISM

By T.K. McNeil

“When I pronounce the word future the first syllable already belongs to the past” Wistawa Szmborska

Future Concerns

Of all human concepts, the future is among the most pervasive

Of all human concepts, the future is among the pervasive.

Of all human concepts, the future is among the most pervasive, as well as the most powerful. The basis for the concern around children as well as the justification for some horrendous acts. It is also one of the least certain and most fraught with problems.

Consensus Future

“Consensus future” refers to the visions of the future most people agree on. Largely because they are the visions that we have been given through culture. This includes the notion of cloning, first presented in a major way in the 1993 film Jurassic Park. And self-driving cars, have  been a common futuristic theme in popular culture since at least the 1960’s. Just think Batman. The majority of technology trends are imagined and created on consensus future.

Ballardian Banality

British science fiction writer created future worlds.

British science fiction writer J.G. Ballard created future worlds.

One of the biggest issues with future forecasting, particularly in terms of technology trends, is the fundamental unpredictability of both people and markets. Even a brief glance at the history of technology trends reveals an essential inability to show where trends are going to go, as well as a strong tendency towards normalization. One of the sharpest observers of this latter trend was the British science fiction author J.G. Ballard. Ballard created future worlds at the height of the future craze of the mid-20th century that were remarkable, mostly for the basic lack of surprise shown by the characters to the technology that surrounded them. Embryonic proof of the consensus future.

Manufactured Normalcy

One of the lesser known theories in terms of futurism is “manufactured normalcy”. With regard to technology trends, this term refers to the tendency of people to adapt quickly to any new piece of technology. The first period of excitement getting shorter as the turnaround between new models continues to decrease. It has, in fact, been argued that such surprise, or “future shock” as term by sociologist Alvin Toffler in his 1970 book of the same name, has largely subsided, if it ever existed at all. This happens even if the technology in question is not actually boring, or at all commonplace, and tends to apply, especially to things inside the consensus future narrative.

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Pete Buttigieg Calls Out Evangelicals

Pete Buttigieg Calls Out Evangelicals
If you haven’t seen this news snip of Mayor Pete it is time you did. We here at www.calamitypolitics.com were moved by this man’s honesty. What a heart touching disclosure. I’m loving Pete Buttigieg. If you haven’t got a favorite for the primaries, you should take a look at this gay, son of an immigrant with the hard to pronounce name. I think he can bring something valuable to the conversation-Vote Democrat, they have the working person’s back. #BlueWave2020Darlene

21 Reasons to Smile, in Spite of Donald Trump

COMMENT:

21 Reasons to Smile, in Spite of Donald Trump

By D. S. Mitchell

I sat down with computer in lap and began writing my 441 www.calamitypolitics.com post

Another Post

I sat down with computer in my lap and began writing my 445th post to www.calamitypolitics.com.  Before I started this blog, I worried that I wouldn’t have enough to write about. I mean, it even occurred to me that I might exhaust all my grievances against the Mango Menace within a couple of weeks. I was so innocent. So naive.

TV Has-been

Who would have thought that a TV reality show has-been, would be elected to run the White House like a New York slumlord. How could any of us; with our limited historical perspective, ever imagined the extent of perversion, fraud and corruption that this grifter president could bring to Washington. My God, reporters have an average of a scandal, or two, a day, to choose from. In fact the scandals and corruption news is coming so fast and furious that we have to literally bob and weave to stay clear of flying falsehoods and denials.

Breaking News Feed

In fact, on a really good Friday afternoon two or three of the juiciest scandals in American history will explode on the CNN Breaking News feed.  Yes, every Friday. Like clockwork. I just said American history. It is the most mind-spinning administration of graft and compromise in U.S. history. What other administrations in memory could, in one week, produce more scandals than the Obama, Bush, and Reagan administrations combined.

Hold On

I recommend you hold on to that safety strap. I expect the tempo of the legal battles are about to pick up speed. Subpoenas will be flying out of the House. My “trouble coming” antennae are quivering. We are on a perilous ride, created by the megalomania of Donald Trump.

Choice of Vices

Now it’s time to open a bottle of wine, roll a doobie, or grab a box of chocolates, whichever be your particular vice. Then find a comfortable chair sit back and just breathe. While savoring your wine I am going to share with you some positive and uplifting energy.

Here are 21 Reasons to Smile: In Spite of Donald Trump

  • Astronauts
  • Sunsets over water
  • Wraparound sunglasses
  • The Science Channel
  • Getting the perfect selfie
  • The Muppets
  • Touching toes under the covers
  • Blowing the wrapper off the straw
  • Winning at Monopoly
  • A dog’s cold nose
  • Warm apple cake
  • Winning at Monopoly
  • Old jeans that fit just right
  • The clatter of skis being loaded
  • Drawing a Royal Flush
  • The rumble of a train as it passes
  • The imagination of a six-year-old
  • Your lover’s voice
  • A friend’s hug
  • Daddy’s wisdom
  • Lady Gaga
  • Old yellowed family photographs
  • Denim and plaid

Have another glass of wine. We’ll connect again.

Darlene