THE BENEFITS OF PORNOGRAPHY

JUST MY OPINION:

SEX, SPIN AND THE BENEFITS OF PORNOGRAPHY

By T.K. McNeil

Always With Us

Archeologists have long known that as long as there have been people there has been sex. And nearly as long as there has been human sexuality there have been representations of it.  Whatever medium was available at the time, cave wall, animal tusk, clay or papyrus pornography was available. Obviously, our forefathers understood the benefits of pornography.

Across Cultures

The early civilizations incorporated sex into their art and music

Earliest civilizations incorporated sex into art

Through sculpting, painting, and pottery the ancients depicted the benefits of pornography.  Egyptian artisans depicted the beauty of human sexuality. This goes for the written word, there being some pretty racy entries in the Bible.  The Song of Solomon being a famous example. The Romans through sculpture glorified human sexuality.  Pre-Christian Viking sagas told of great adventures; and no great adventure would be worth telling if there wasn’t plenty of sex.

Today

The benefits of pornography have followed us through the ages; emerging today primarily in streaming videos on the internet.  Thanks to the vision of our forefathers we have reached for the stars and surpassed them.

Under the Corset

There is a misconception, particularly among the young, that “porn films” are a new phenomenon with a history dating back to the mid-1960’s. In terms of commercial availability, this is correct. Though woefully inaccurate when it comes to the history of the genre.  The allegedly stodgy and prudish Victorian Brits were one of the first societies to recognize the potential benefits of pornography.

Stag Films

Stag films flourished during Victorian era

Stag films flourished during the Victorian era

Not only did some of the earliest erotic photography come out of the Victorian era but it was a time that gave rise to “stag” films. The “stag” film is one of the earliest examples of modern film pornography. The earliest examples of the genre use many of the same story contexts and camera angles used in films today.

Banned

“Stag” films, banned under the censorship of the Motion Picture Production Code, did little to show the benefits of pornography. The censorship authority also known as the “Hays Code” was in effect from 1922 through 1968. Despite the ban, “stag” films dominated the lucrative underground black market of that time.

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60,800 Professionals Agree: The President of the U.S. is a Crazy Ass Criminal

26000 mental health professionals signed on to a letter warning the public about Trump's mental health.

Professionals Agree U.S. President Is A Crazy Ass Criminal

By D. S. Mitchell

60,000 Mental Health Professionals Agree

60,000 mental health professionals have signed on to a letter warning of Donald J. Trump’s mental instability. Now 800 former prosecutors claim if Trump were not president he would have been indicted for obstruction of justice. So, that is 60,800 people who point to the president of the U.S. as a crazy ass criminal. Hmm.

800 Former Prosecutors Sign On

Recently 800 former prosecutors signed on to a letter stating that if Donald J. Trump was not President of the United States he would be indicted for obstruction of justice. Sadly, Donald J. Trump is president of the United States. This is not the first time that Donald Trump has been identified as unfit to be president of the United States.

Please Read

Robert Mueller was Special Counsel

Robert Mueller was appointed Special Counsel to investigate the Russian interference in 2016 Presidential election

The former prosecutors who signed on to the public letter are begging the American people to please read the Mueller Report. The Report can be downloaded from the internet or purchased at Amazon or Wal-Mart. By reading the report anyone will be able to see Trump’s efforts at obstruction of justice close up.

Listen To The Experts

It might serve us well to listen to the experts when it comes to criminal obstruction of justice. I am reading the Mueller Report as I write this post, and it is disturbing. No matter what AG Bill Barr and President Trump claim, the experts are screaming at us. Donald Trump is not only mentally ill, he is also a criminal.

DOJ Policy

The Mueller report did not determine that Trump had committed criminal obstruction of justice, in part because of the DOJ policy against indicting sitting presidents, but Mueller did write that “if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.”

Over, Is Not Over

There are so many troublesome questions about what the president did, and is doing, that it is impossible for any thinking American to believe that we should just turn off the lights, close the door and ignore the findings of a $25 million dollar, two-and-one-half-year investigation. Maybe the bought-off Republicans are ready to sign on to AG Barr’s fictional exoneration story but most of us are not.

Corrupt Attempt

In their public letter, now 800 prosecutors state, “The Mueller report describes several acts that satisfy all the elements for an obstruction charge: conduct that obstructed or attempted to obstruct the truth-finding process, as to which the evidence of corrupt intent and connection to pending proceedings is overwhelming.” The eleven following areas of possible obstruction are taken as direct quotes from the prosecutor’s letter.

800 former prosecutors claim Trump committed obstruction of justice

800 former prosecutors claim Trump committed obstruction of justice multiple times

The Eleven Areas of Possible Obstruction  

  1. Trump campaign denies Russian connections. “After WikiLeaks released politically damaging Democratic Party emails that were reported to have been hacked by Russia, Trump publicly expressed skepticism that Russia was responsible for the hacks….Trump also denied having any business in or connections to Russia, even though as late as June 2016 the Trump Organization had been pursuing a licensing deal for a skyscraper to be built in Russia called Trump Tower Moscow. After the election, the president expressed concerns to advisors that reports of Russia’s election interference might lead the public to question the legitimacy of his election.”
  2. Trump asks Comey for “loyalty,” and then to “go easy”  on Michael Flynn.  “On January 27, 2017 the day after the President was told that Flynn had lied to the Vice President and had made similar statements to the FBI, the President invited FBI Director Comey to a private dinner at the White House and told Comey that he needed loyalty. On February 14, the day after the President requested Flynn’s resignation, the President told an outside advisor, ‘Now that we fired Flynn, the Russia thing is over’… Later that afternoon, the President cleared the Oval Office to have a one-on-one meeting with Comey. Referring to the FBI’s investigation of Flynn, the President said, ‘I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go.'”
  3. Trump rages against Session’s recusal, and puts even more pressure on Comey. “In early March, the President told White House Counsel Donald McGahn to stop Sessions from recusing. And after Sessions announced his recusal on March 2, the President expressed anger at the decision and told advisors that he should have an Attorney General who would protect him. That weekend, the President took Sessions aside at an event and urged him to ‘unrecuse’…(T)he President reached out to the Director of National Intelligence and the leaders of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the National Security Agency (NSA) to ask them what they could do to publicly dispel the suggestion that the President had any connection to the Russian election-interference effort…The President also twice called Comey directly, not withstanding guidance from McGahn to avoid direct contacts with the Department of Justice.”

    James Comey Reports Distressing Conversations

    James Comey Reports Distressing Conversations with President Donald Trump

  4. Trump fires Comey. “The day of the firing, the White House maintained that Comey’s termination resulted from independent recommendations from the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General that Comey should be discharged for mishandling the Hillary Clinton email investigation. But the President had decided to fire Comey before hearing from the Department of Justice. The day after the firing Comey, the President told Russian officials that he had ‘faced great pressure because of Russia,’ which had been ‘taken off’ by Comey’s firing. The next day, the President acknowledged in a television interview that he was going to fire Comey regardless of the Department of Justice’s recommendation and that when he ‘decided to just do it,’ he was thinking that ‘this thing with Trump and Russia is a made-up story.'”
  5. Trump freaks out over Mueller’s appointment and tries to quash it. “The President reacted to news that a Special Counsel had been appointed by telling advisors that it was ‘the end of his presidency’ and demanding that Sessions resign. Sessions submitted his resignation, but the President ultimately did not accept it. The President told aides that the Special Counsel had conflicts of interest and suggested that the Special Counsel therefore could not serve. On June 14, 2017, the media reported that the Special Counsel’s Office was investigating whether the President had obstructed justice…The President reacted to this news with a series of tweets criticizing the Department of Justice and the Special Counsel’s investigation. On June 17, 2017  the President called McGahn at home and directed him to call the Acting Attorney General (Rosenstein) and say that the Special Counsel had conflicts of interest and must be removed. McGahn did not carry out the direction, however, deciding that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre (a reference to Nixon firing numerous DOJ officials on October 20, 1973 related to the Watergate scandal).
  6. Trump tries to stop Mueller’s investigation. “On June 19, 2017, the President met one-on-one in the Oval Office with his former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, a trusted advisor outside the government, and dictated a message for Lewandowski to deliver to Sessions. The message said that Sessions should publicly announce that, not withstanding his recusal from the Russia investigation, the investigation was ‘very unfair’ to the President, the President had done nothing wrong, and Sessions planned to meet with the Special Counsel and ‘let (him) move forward with investigating election meddling for future elections.’ One month later, in another private meeting with Lewandowski on July 19, 2017, the President asked about the status of his message for Sessions to limit the Special Counsel investigation to future election interference. Lewandowski did not want to deliver the President’s message personally, so he asked senior White House official Rick Dearborn to deliver it to Sessions. Dearborn was uncomfortable with the task and did not follow through.”

    Donald Trump Jr. gave conflicting stories about Trump Tower meeting with Russian lawyer

    Trump Jr. gave conflicting stories about the Trump Tower meeting with Russian attorney

  7. Trump suppresses information on Trump Tower meeting with a Russian agent. “On several occasions, the President directed aides not to publicly disclose the emails setting up the June 9 meeting, suggesting that the emails would not leak and that the number of lawyers with access to them should be limited. Before the emails became public, the President edited a press statement for Trump Jr. by deleting a line that acknowledged that the meeting was with ‘an individual who (Trump Jr.) was told might have information helpful to the campaign’ and instead said only that the meeting was about adoptions of Russian children. When the press asked questions about the President’s involvement in Trump Jr.’s statement, the President’s personal lawyer repeatedly denied the President had played any role.”
  8. Trump again pressures Sessions to un-recuse and get control of Mueller. “In early summer 2017, the President called Sessions at home and again asked him to reverse his recusal from the Russia investigation. Sessions did not reverse his recusal. In October 2017, the President met privately with Sessions in the Oval Office and asked him to ‘take (a) look’ at investigating Clinton. In December 2017, shortly after Flynn pleaded guilty pursuant to a cooperation agreement (with Special Counsel), the President met with Sessions in the Oval Office and suggested, according to notes taken by a senior advisor, that if Sessions unrecused and took back supervision of the Russia investigation, he would be a ‘hero.'”
  9. Trump orders Don McGahn to lie about earlier efforts to fire Mueller. “In early 2018, the press reported that the President had directed McGahn to have the Special Counsel removed in June 2017 and that McGahn had threatened to resign rather than carry out the order. The President reacted to the news stories by directing White House officials to tell McGahn to dispute the story and create a record stating he had not been ordered to have the Special Counsel removed.”
  10.  Trump tries to flatter and perhaps bribe Flynn and Manafort.  “After Flynn withdrew from a joint defense agreement with the President and began cooperating with the government, the President’s personal counsel left a message for Flynn’s attorneys reminding them of the President’s warm feelings toward Flynn, which he said ‘still remains,’ and asking for a ‘heads up’ if Flynn knew ‘information that implicates the President’…During Manafort’s prosecution and when the jury in his criminal trial was deliberating, the President praised Manafort in public, said that Manafort was being treated unfairly, and declined to rule out a pardon. After Manafort was convicted, the President called Manafort ‘a brave man’ for refusing to ‘break’ and said that ‘flipping almost ought to be outlawed.'” **Reporting on May 16, 2019 indicates that General Michael Flynn and his attorneys were contacted multiple times by Trump surrogates in the Congress (person or persons as yet unidentified).

    President Trump blamed the Democrats and "liar" Michael Cohen for his problems

    President Trump blamed the Democrats and “liar” & “rat” Michael Cohen for his problems

  11. Trump tries to intimidate Michael Cohen.  “The President’s conduct toward Michael Cohen, a former Trump Organization executive, changed from praise for Cohen when he falsely minimized the President’s involvement in the Trump Tower Moscow project, to castigation of Cohen when he became a cooperating witness…(A)fter Cohen began cooperating with the government in the summer of 2018, the President publicly criticized him, called him a ‘rat,’ and suggested that his family members had committed crimes.'”

Summary Of Principal Findings

William Barr provided his summary of principal findings

William Barr provided a 4 page summary of principal findings.

On March 24, 2019 Attorney General William Barr issued a four page letter giving a “summary of principal findings” of the Mueller Report. Three weeks later, on April 18, 2019 Barr stood before television cameras and said that Robert Mueller had found no actionable incidents where the President had committed a criminal obstruction of justice. Nor, was there ‘collusion’ with the Russians.

Mueller Report Contradictions

Despite Barr’s claims the Mueller’s Report was a clear depiction of exactly what President Trump did to stop the investigation. In other words, to commit a criminal obstruction of justice. Barr with the flat affect of a zombie told the world it would be hard to prove such allegations beyond a reasonable doubt.

Disputed Findings

Barr determined that the Mueller report was “not sufficient” to establish any criminal wrongdoing by the president including criminal obstruction of justice. However, 0ver 800 former federal prosecutors acknowledged the potential defenses of Trump’s behavior and rejected Barr’s reasoning anyway.

Report Hamstrung

Many feel that The Mueller Report was hamstrung by DOJ regulations. However,”To look at these facts and say that a prosecutor could not probably sustain a conviction for obstruction of justice — the standard set out in Principles of Federal Prosecution — runs counter to logic and our experience,” wrote the 800 plus former prosecutors who signed a letter of protest to the Attorney General Barr’s reported conclusions on criminal obstruction of justice.

In Favor Of Prosecution

“As former federal prosecutors, we recognize that prosecuting obstruction of justice cases is critical because unchecked obstruction — which allows intentional interference with criminal investigations to go unpunished — puts our whole system of justice at risk,” they concluded. “We believe strongly that, but for the (Office of Legal Counsel policy against indicting a sitting President), the overwhelming weight of professional judgment would come down in favor of prosecution for the conduct outlined in the Mueller Report.”

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