60 Beauty Tips For Women Of A Certain Age

60 Beauty Tips For Women Of A Certain Age

As Women's History Month comes to a close, Anna Hessel pokes fun at women of a certain age.

60 Beauty Tips For Women Of A Certain Age

By Anna Hessel

 

Certain Age, Turn The Page…

In honor of Women’s History Month, let’s help us beautiful women of a certain age look and feel our best with sixty ways to be fabulous in your forties, fifties, sixties, seventies, eighties, nineties, and beyond…

Ten For Zen…

  1. Moisturize, moisturize, moisturize…
  2. Choose dentists wisely – be as discerning as you would with any other doctor, and use teeth whitening products. White teeth take years off your face.
  3. Accessorize; don’t overdo it but definitely use accessories to your best advantage.
  4. Don’t ever wear stained clothes or apparel with holes or tears, unless they are supposed to be there.
  5. Wear clothes that fit and float away from the body. Don’t let frumpy become your friend. This goes double for tacky; don’t look cheap.
  6. Even if you can only afford thrift or mass merchandise store clothes, keep them clean and repaired. Check seams and button holes for the best quality you can afford.
  7. Get manicures and pedicures – chipped polish and talons are not flattering.
  8. Wear a decent bra and Spanx or the like.
  9. Avoid dangerous plastic surgery but non invasive Brazilian butt lifts, face peels, skin tightening, microdermabrasion, and micro-needling can help you look your best.
  10. Don’t smoke.

Twenty And Plenty…

  1. Bathe or shower daily.
  2. Moisturize your eye area; I have used Vaseline and eye cream for years, and it pays off.
  3. Bangs are cheaper and likely safer than Botox.
  4. Get some exercise. I love water exercise; dance, yoga – do whatever your mobility level allows.
  5. Wear whatever you like – age appropriate is what you can rock, however, don’t wear clothes with teddy bears or the like.
  6. Use a good quality neck cream, whatever you can afford, but expensive doesn’t always mean better.
  7. Try to avoid stress but if you can’t destress the best you can.
  8. Be well groomed – razors, tweezers, and waxing are your friends.
  9. Wear makeup – not too much, not too little.
  10. Smile, even if your mask hides it – your eyes show it.

Thirty And Flirty…

  1. Laugh lines mean you laugh and have joy in your life. We have earned every wrinkle.
  2. Go blonde, it gives the illusion of thickness, hides gray hairs, and adds body.
  3. Do not wear socks with sandals, or Velcro closure anything, ever.
  4. Get your rest, eat in color: fruits, veggies, lean protein, and don’t over do sugar.
  5. Don’t over indulge in alcohol but wine can be a mature woman’s friend.
  6. Search the net or magazines for hairstyles that flatter mature faces and thinner tresses. Take a photo to show your hair stylist. Avoid gels, opt for mousse. Condition but don’t over condition. Dry shampoos for bangs and the scalp area are helpful.
  7. Find a skin care regimen that works for you. Never go to bed without washing your face. Wash the makeup and day away but avoid harsh cleansers.
  8. Don’t blot your lipstick.
  9. Matte lipsticks are great under a mask but drying. Don’t forget your lip area – lip masks and balm are very important
  10. Exfoliate, exfoliate, exfoliate…

Forty And Fun…

  1. Eyebrows need extra care at our age: pencil, gel, henna, and tints are all options to fill in sparse brows.
  2. Mascara both top and bottom lashes; falsies are in style, go for it…
  3. A bit of fragrance adds a feminine touch.
  4. Smart is beautiful.
  5. Have fun – it will take some years off.
  6. Have faith – it shows on your face.
  7. Use heat hair styling appliances sparingly and condition, but be careful of conditioners and hair products that weigh hair down.
  8. Avoid severe hair styles and extra heavy hair spray.
  9. I had read someplace that beautiful Martha Stewart starts each day by applying a face mask. I have begun to adopt this daily routine.
  10. It’s okay to not be twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty or even seventy, beauty is not a number or a size.

Fifty And Nifty…

  1. Parabens, mineral oil, and petroleum, I do avoid but admit to using petroleum jelly. Try coconut oil for a natural alternative.
  2. Avoid chemicals, preservatives, artificial flavors or colors, and processed food.
  3. Wear Betsey Johnson and Norma Kamali; at what age do we stop having fun with our clothes and accessories? Never.
  4. Be cautious and educated before trying a new beauty procedure of any kind.
  5. Tried and true microdermabrasion is a great exfoliating treatment, salon or home based – it gets rid of dead skin cells; use a firming moisturizer to follow.
  6. Products containing retinol, hyaluronic acid, and salicylic acid are helpful. A good facial with extraction will remove blackheads safely.
  7. Avoid adult acne with proper cleansing and use heavy moisturizers, especially those containing oils, in moderation. A little goes a long way.
  8. Minoxidil for women and supplements such as biotin for hair, skin, and nails are excellent for women our age, as our hair thins.
  9. Don’t sleep on your face and keep linens, especially pillowcases, very clean.
  10. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate – drink plenty of water. We filter our tap water and I love bottled water, especially Evian.

Sixty Is Sexy…

  1. Avoid saturated fats, but opt for healthy fats such as nuts, salmon and the like.
  2. Don’t experiment with new skin or hair care before a major event; this goes double for haircuts and beauty procedures.
  3. We all have an overly enthusiastic friend, family member, or colleague that sells a direct market cosmetic line that is working wonders for them, maybe we sell a line ourselves, but don’t feel obligated to buy, use what works for you. Don’t expect to look twenty again; be realistic in choosing skin care but good dermal maintenance is a must.
  4. Pets are a blessing – they help us destress and show lots of love. Show your love to an animal, it will show on your beautiful face.
  5. Maintain excellent posture – don’t slouch still holds true. Hold your tummy in, your shoulders back and down. Strut like you mean it, knee brace and all.
  6. If you can no longer wear stilettos, there are many attractive shoes out there with lower heels or flats.
  7. Make your own homemade beauty products. Find recipes online or experiment. It’s a great way to use up recently outdated fruits, yogurt, cucumbers, or the like. Coffee grinds make a great cellulite treatment but can be a bit of a mess to use.
  8. We all know what Elle Woods says about endorphins: “Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy.” Sex is exercise – just saying…
  9. Live life like Elle after Warner tells her she is not smart enough for Harvard Law.
  10. “And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance…” Dancing will give you endorphins…

Ready, Set, Grow!

Go for it, beautiful woman of a certain age – you are stunning…

Women’s Day Celebrates Women

30 Quotes Celebrating Women

March 8, International Women's Day is a day we celebrate the accomplishments of women around the world.

30 Quotes Celebrating Women:

International Women’s Day

D. S. Mitchell

March 8th marks a wartime strike in 1917, when Russian women demanded “bread and peace”. Within four days of the strike’s start, the tsar was forced to abdicate and the provisional government granted women the right to vote. That is how and why March 8 became the date we celebrate Women’s Day.

The date is recognized world wide as International Women’s Day; a day to recognize the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. It is also a day to raise awareness of women’s equality and lobby for accelerated gender parity. I thought it might be fun to look at some famous quotes celebrating women, so here goes, be inspired:

3o Quotes Honoring Women

1.) “Here’s to strong women: May we know them. May we be them. May we raise them.” –Unknown

2.) “To tell a woman everything she cannot do is to tell her what she can.” –Spanish Proverb

3.) “Well-behaved women rarely make history.” –Eleanor Roosevelt

4.) “The best protection any woman can have is courage.” –Elizabeth Cady Stanton

5.) “Where there is a woman, there is magic.” –Ntozake Shange

6.) “You were given this life because you are strong enough to live it.” –Unknown

7.) “Women are the largest untapped reservoir of talent in the world.” –Hilary Clinton

8.) “Feminism is for everyone.”-Bell Hooks

9.) “There’s nothing a man can do that I can’t do better and in heels.” –Ginger Rogers

10.) “Above all, be the heroine of your life. Not the victim.” –Nora Ephron

11.) “Girls should never be afraid to be smart.” –Emma Watson

12.) “Life is tough, my darling, but so are you.” –Stephanie Bennett-Henry

13.) “A strong woman looks a challenge in the eye and gives it a wink.” –Gina Carey

14.) “She wasn’t looking for a knight. She was looking for a sword.” –Atticus

15.) “A strong woman stands up for herself. A stronger woman stands up for everyone else.” –Unknown

16.) “Feminism isn’t about making women strong. Women are already strong. It’s about changing the way the world perceives that strength.” –G.D. Anderson

17.) “You can always tell who the strong women are. They are the ones you see building one another up instead of tearing each other down.” –Unknown

18.) “The question isn’t who’s going to let me; it’s who’s going to stop me.” –Ayn Rand

19.) “I’m tough, I’m ambitious, and I know exactly what I want. If that makes me a bitch, okay.” –Madonna

20.) “A woman is like a tea bag: You can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water.” –Eleanor Roosevelt

21.) “A woman should be like a single flower—not a whole bouquet.” –Anna Held

22.) “I know what I bring to the table… So trust me when I say I’m not afraid to eat alone.” –Unknown

23.) “Women are the real architects of society.” –Cher

24.) “When women wake, mountains move.” Chinese Proverb

25.)  “She’s a strong cup of black coffee in a world that is drunk on the cheap wine of shallow love.” –Unknown

26.) “Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you.” –Unknown

27.) “I expect woman will be the last thing civilized by man.” –George Meredith

28.) “Women are made to be loved, not understood.” –Oscar Wilde

29.) “The age of a woman doesn’t mean a thing. The best tunes are played on the oldest fiddles.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson

30.) “In our society, the women who break down barriers are those who ignore limits” –Arnold Schwarzenegger

https://www.calamitypolitics.com/2017/03/29/quotes-on-courage/

 

The Powerful Words Of Dr. King

The Powerful Words Of Dr. King

Dr. MLK had powerful words for our society

The Powerful Words Of Dr. King

By Wes & Anna Hessel

 

The Great Doctor

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., stands as the paramount leader of the civil rights movement.  There were many more alongside him, most notably the other members of the “Big Six”.  They were James Farmer, A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, Whitney Young, and John Lewis.  But Dr. King, or MLK, as many refer to him, was the most visible light and lightning rod.

He Still Speaks To Us

His words continue to speak volumes today, calling us to continue the fight for what is right. Most particularly right now is the need to pass the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act and the Freedom to Vote Act.  That is the legacy that should be made to honor both these men who worked staunchly for what they believed.  Dr. King’s own family is calling for a hold on celebrating his day until these voting rights bills are made law.  In the meantime, we hear the echoes of MLK’s quotable phrases and speeches.

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Memories of a Montana Christmas

Memories of a Montana Christmas

I remember Montana winters with snow and family.

Memories of a Montana Christmas

Christmas Memories. . . Reflections on a Different Time

By Megan Wallin

I  remember many of my childhood Christmases being snow-covered, Kinkade-looking holidays, because we weren’t at home in the dreary and temperate climate of Seattle, Washington, but venturing into the small town on Alberton, Montana.

My mom and her then-boyfriend would take me with them to visit his family in that small town nearly every Christmas or Thanksgiving. There, I would read endless books in their basement, drink an abundance of hot chocolate, build giant snowmen, cut down a Christmas tree near their family cabin, and occasionally wander around finding remains of dead animals—all of which was utterly fascinating for a kid used to life in the city.

For context, this was the mid-1990’s, a time when children weren’t glued to the internet, there were no Tik Tok trends, and we had actual breaks from our classmates’ influence during vacations due to the absence of social media. Parents also seemed more at ease with our lack of ties to the outside world, and—perhaps under the misconception that the world was “safer” then—would sometimes let us roam during the day and come back for dinner at evening. One year, that roaming took a particularly dangerous turn.

I was about ten years old, and the snowfall from the previous night had created a white blanket that came up to my knees when I tried to walk. Naturally, this was an invitation to hop and skip through the fields just beyond the house where we were staying.

Once I ventured past the road and began walking through the field alongside it, I became a bit careless, jumping around in the newly fallen snow, enjoying the feeling of falling down into something not quite solid. I hadn’t ventured far, and could still see the house in the distance, with the road nearby barely visible under the fresh blanket of white. The air was cold enough to feel heavy, and the silence of no traveling cars, or other people, seemed to add to that weight.

Moments like these were some of the most peaceful my city-bound senses could take in. Then it happened.

The ground beneath me seemed to completely give way, and that falling sensation lasted for an uncomfortably long time. I think my surprise was so great and the air so cold that I couldn’t even muster a shocked yelp. I just fell dangerously into a narrow pit, previously wholly unnoticed.

What I had discovered was a hole left by the removal of an old telephone pole, and while it didn’t fill completely with snow, it was difficult to see given the current conditions. There was barely enough room for my body, the space was so slim, and it was a wonder I hadn’t broken a limb during descent. But there I was: trapped, standing straight up and down like a soldier, with little room to move or climb my way out of the frozen earth, and nothing to grip.

Snow was still falling. I found my voice, taking in a full inhalation of cold air after breathlessly screaming, “Help!”

I quickly began running through scenarios in my mind of who would discover my body, and when, and how. Would it be Spring? I tried to picture who would attend the funeral at the Presbyterian church we attended in West Seattle. My mind raced with questions about whether I would die from the cold or suffocate from being buried alive. Fortunately, I didn’t have much time alone with my thoughts.

Coincidently, and not at all in 1990’s fashion, an adult was already looking for me. One of the nephews had ventured out to see if the small child who had come to visit was actually wearing a proper coat for the weather. He heard my panicked screams and interceded immediately, perhaps already aware of the gaping hole in the ground.

I spent the next hour drinking hot chocolate and regaling the group with my tale of “near death,” snuggled up in a warm blanket and gazing outside occasionally. I knew it would be a while before my mom let me outside-and out of sight-again.

Now I think back on those times as we all prepare for holidays where we sit in someone’s living room with a large television present and likely no snow outside, and continually micro-manage our children who are either on screens or needing excess supervision because they are otherwise occupied. (Either way, we’re essentially deciding between “more than the recommended amount of screen time” or “potential trip to the E.R.”)

On one hand, our children aren’t in danger of being buried alive in the snow in a remote small town in Montana. On the other hand, holidays have become just another day off work and school, where we provide an excess of toys and entertainment only for it to pale in comparison to one day in a newly formed snowdrift.

For now, I accept that nostalgia may cover a multitude of sins, so to speak. Life wasn’t necessarily better or worse a few decades ago; it was simply different.

 

Thanksgiving In Perspective

OPINION: Thanksgiving In Perspective

OPINION: From My Perspective

A Traditional Thanksgiving May Become a Relic of the Past

By Megan Wallin

As an adoptee with strong ties to and respect for my biological Oglala Lakota heritage—now three generations and several European ancestors away from life on the reservation—I’ve had some qualms with traditional American views of Thanksgiving.

There are quite a few people (Native and Non) who feel similarly, but I’ve also spoken with some elders who, despite being deeply ingrained in their tribal cultures, feel neutral on the subject. Their reasoning? Holidays are what you make them. For many, any holiday is a day off to share with loved ones and focus on gratitude, and that includes this one. Still, it remains a bleak reminder of the origin story behind genocide and intergeneration trauma.

Ironically, some of the people I’ve talked to who are most passionately opposed to Thanksgiving have entirely European heritage. They’ve proposed enjoying the day off but celebrating a Harvest Day, changing the title and the focus of a day ultimately rooted in celebrating colonialism that led to the destruction of tribes, families, cultures and languages. They’re certainly not wrong to think that.

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10 Plus Tips To Cope With Anxiety

Got Holiday Anxiety?

With Thanksgiving comes tension for some. . .

10 Plus Tips To Cope


Don’t Let Anxiety Ruin Your Holidays

By D. S. Mitchell 

Turkey and Pumpkin Pie 

The holidays are right around the corner. Some are excited about turkey and gravy, and fancy wrapped presents, but others see only stress and anxiety on the horizon. If you are hosting parties, the stress level is on steroids; fancy china, excited young ones, guests, surprise and otherwise. It can seem overwhelming. Read on if you are looking for some tips on how to get you through the holidays as anxiety free as possible.

Be Ready

Stay rested and recharged, ahead of the holidays. Take time for yourself.  Get enough sleep, engage in activities that you enjoy and make you feel good. Don’t skip self care routines under the pressure of the approaching holidays. Don’t do it-skipping health care routines will cost in the long run. You need that 30 minutes of cardio and any other health activities you are engaged in. These activities will keep you balanced and ready to face the upcoming holiday challenges. It just might be yoga, biking, stretching, Tai Chi, or  aqua aerobics, that  saves your sanity.

Everyone has different triggers, and identifying them is one of the most important steps to coping and managing anxiety attacks. Common ones, your first day at a new job, heading an important meeting, meeting your SO’s parents. Time and reflection will be required to identify your triggers. In the meantime, there are things you can do to try to help calm or quiet your anxious mind.

4.) Use aromatherapy

Whether they’re in oil form, incense, or a candle, scents like lavender, chamomile, and sandalwood are soothing. Certain receptors in your brain are activated by aromatherapy.

5.) Walking or Yoga

Just walk away if the situation is causing anxiety. It might be time to focus on  your body and not your mind to relieve your anxiety. Just move. Whether it’s the pool or the yoga mat, move your butt, it helps reduce stress. Try stretching, it can be incredibly beneficial.

6.) Write down your thoughts

Many mental health therapists suggest a client write down what’s causing their anxiety. Writing it down, gets it out of your head and can make it less daunting. My mother used this one, on a regular basis. She would write letters to the offenders and put them in envelopes addressed to whoever was causing her frustration and then stick it in a file, never sending it.

Not All Anxiety Is The Same
The previous suggestions are helpful if your symptoms are situational or sporadic. If anxiety is an on-going, persistent part of you life you may need more serious interventions and coping strategies.
Five Strategies For Coping With Long-Term Illness 

If anxiety is a regular part of your life, not just around the holidays, it’s important to find treatment strategies to help you manage it. There might be a combination of things, like talk therapy and meditation, or perhaps cutting out or resolving your anxiety trigger. Confused, as to where to start? It is always helpful to discuss options with a mental health professional who might suggest something you hadn’t thought of before moving ahead with your plan.

Some Well-Known Triggers:
  • debt
  • a stressful work environment
  • traveling
  • driving
  • DNA-genetics — anxiety, depression, alcoholism can run in families
  • drug withdrawal
  • medication side effects
  • trauma
  • phobias, such as agoraphobia (fear of crowded or open spaces) and claustrophobia (fear of small spaces)
  • some chronic illnesses like heart disease, diabetes, or asthma
  • chronic pain
  • multiple mental illness diagnoses (such as depression, OCDC, anxiety)
  • caffeine
  • alcohol
Managing Those Triggers

Sometimes triggers can be obvious, such as caffeine, alcohol consumption, and drug use. Other times triggers are less obvious and we may need a therapist to help us isolate those triggers. Long-term stress, such as financial or work-related situations, can be more difficult— is it a due date, a person, or the situation? At this point you may need some extra support, through therapy or with some trusted friends.

Then What?

Once you do figure out your trigger(s), you should try to limit your exposure to them if you can. If you can’t limit it — say because it is due to a stressful work environment that you can’t currently change — using other coping techniques may help.

1.) Try Meditation

A successful meditation regime will take time and practice.  When done regularly, you can train your brain to dismiss anxious thoughts when they arise. If sitting still and concentrating is difficult, try starting your exercise routine with more active physical exertion and then start your yoga routine.

2.) Adopt Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

CBT helps people learn different ways of thinking about and reacting to anxiety-causing situations. A therapist can help you develop ways to change negative thought patterns and behaviors before they spiral into a panic attack.

3.) Healthy Diet, Regular Exercise, Embrace Life 

Exercise regularly. Eat balanced meals. Get enough sleep. Stay connected to people who care about you. You may want to talk to your psychiatrist about adding supplements or nutrients to your long-term strategy.

4.) Consider Adding Supplements

Research shows certain supplements or nutrients help reduce anxiety symptoms. Some of these include:

  • lemon balm
  • omega-3 fatty acids
  • green tea
  • valerian root
  • dark chocolate (in moderation)

It can take up to three months before your body is actually using the nutrition these herbs and foods provide. If you’re taking other medications, make sure to discuss herbal remedies with your doctor. I’ve said that twice. I cannot say it enough. Different medications interact with one another whether OTC  or prescription. Talk to your doc.

5.) Prescription Medications

If your anxiety is severe enough that your mental health practitioner believes you’d benefit from psychotropic medication, there are a number of directions to go, depending on your symptoms. Discuss your concerns with your doctor.

Is My Anxiety Harmful?

Identifying what variety of anxiety you’re dealing with can be challenging-mainly because everyone’s body reacts to danger in entirely different ways. I’m sure you have heard “anxiety” used as a general term for feeling worry, uneasiness, or nervousness. It is often situational, a big dance, a speech, a tryout; it is often a feeling grown in response to an upcoming event that has an uncertain outcome. Every human being deals with such emotions-at some time in their life. It is part of how we are wired, our brains respond to perceived danger, even if there is no real danger.

Things Can Get Dark

There are times anxiety can get serious and turn into anxiety attacks that may begin slowly and initially feel manageable, but build up over a few hours. (Panic attacks are different. A panic attack comes out of the blue and then subsides.)

Signs and Symptoms of an anxiety attack

These are some of the more common mental and physical symptoms of anxiety:

  • feelings of danger, panic, or dread
  • nervousness/restlessness
  • rapid heart rate
  • sweating
  • trembling/chills
  • tiredness/weakness
  • gastric problems
  • difficulty focusing
  • rapid breathing, hyperventilating

It is possible to have both an anxiety and panic attack simultaneously. The quick coping strategies mentioned above may also help with a panic attack.

Try focusing on an object, repeating a mantra, closing your eyes, and going to your happy place.

Signs and Symptoms of a Panic Attack
Causes of Anxiety

If you notice that quick tips haven’t been working, you may want to consider seeing a professional for help. Especially if you believe you have GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder) and the symptoms are interfering with your daily routine and physical symptoms. A mental health professional can help with identifying your triggers, maintaining long-term strategies through behavioral therapy, medications, and more.

Living With Anxiety 

If your anxiety stems from a past trauma, it can be helpful to work through those issues with a licensed therapist. On the other hand, if your brain chemistry predisposes you to persistent, chronic anxiety, you may need to go on medication to manage it. Anxiety is likely to continue to be part of your life, but it doesn’t need to take over your life.  Treatment is available to help control those painful symptoms and make those holidays at least tolerable.

Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween!

Halloween is about candy, fun and costumes.

Happy Halloween!

It’s That Time of Year…

By Anna Hessel

All About Pumpkin Spice

Happy Halloween, everyone!  The pandemic has changed how we celebrate, but it’s fun to remember Halloweens gone by, while dreaming up ways to make new memories.  The crisp fall air, bright and vivid autumn colors, and everything, from facial wash to floor polish, going all pumpkin spice, makes me think of Halloween. Chocolate, candy apples, and costumes, every child’s dream.  The crowning of our newest Miss America made me recall a particular Halloween costume of my youth.

A Mask of a Different Kind

Unlike the very cool Halloween ensembles we now see displayed in retail establishments, when I was child, costumes were different.  They came in a square box with a cellophane window and consisted of a one-piece garment made of a flimsy, shiny nylon, and a full face, molded plastic mask with cutouts for eyes, nostrils, and mouth.  Those masks were quite like a sauna for the face – those of us that have reached a certain age can remember that sweaty-faced feeling that came with wearing one of those frightful false faces.

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Labor Day: Laboring On. . .

Labor Day: Laboring On. . .

Labor Day: Laboring On. . . 

By Wes Hessel

Laboring On…

The calendar end of summer is generally considered Labor Day, the first Monday in September.   But what is Labor Day?  And what is labor?  The idea of a holiday to recognize the organized labor movement was first proposed in 1882. There are two competing stories as to who was responsible, but was it McGuire or Maguire?

McG?

Some historians say Peter McGuire, then-vice president of the AFL (American Federation of Labor), is responsible for the holiday. It is said, McGuire, who had witnessed pro-labor parades in Toronto in May of that year, wanted to see something similar in New York.  According to that narrative, Mr. McGuire pitched the recommendation to the New York City’s CLU (Central Labor Union) on May 8th.  He said like in Canada, the celebration should begin with a labor street march, then finish up with a picnic.  McGuire proposed that the participating labor organizations sell admission tickets to raise funds.  He believed the first Monday in September was perfect for such a holiday. First, it was halfway between Independence Day and Thanksgiving. Second, the September date should insure ideal weather.

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